UN prosecutors begin closing statements at Mladic trial

FILE - In this Friday, June 3, 2011, file photo former Bosnian Serb Gen. Ratko Mladic sits in the court room during his initial appearance at the U.N.'s Yugoslav war crimes tribunal in The Hague, Netherlands. UN prosecutors deliver their closing statement in the marathon genocide trial of former Bosnian Serb military chief Gen. Ratko Mladic, who is accused of commanding forces responsible for the worst atrocities of the Bosnian war. (AP Photo/ Martin Meissner, Pool, File)THE HAGUE, Netherlands (AP) — Gen. Ratko Mladic "called the shots" as his troops murdered and expelled thousands of civilians to carve out an ethnically pure Serb mini-state in Bosnia during the Balkan nation's 1992-95 war, a United Nations prosecutor said Monday as Mladic's genocide trial neared its end.



The Latest: S&P says Italy vote doesn't affect credit rating

The Latest: S&P says Italy vote doesn't affect credit ratingMILAN (AP) — The Latest on the Italian referendum (all times local):



With Dakota denial, outlook for U.S. pipelines turns murky

A man from the Lakota Sioux tribe with a Native American tattoo on his neck poses for a photograph during a protest against plans to pass the Dakota Access pipeline near the Standing Rock Indian Reservation, near Cannon Ball, North DakotaBy Liz Hampton HOUSTON (Reuters) - The U.S. Army's denial of an easement for the Dakota Access Pipeline, after permitting and legal obligations were followed, sets an uncertain precedent for new projects despite President-elect Donald Trump's promise to support energy infrastructure. The decision came after months of protests by the Standing Rock Sioux tribe and others who said the line could desecrate tribal grounds, or a spill could contaminate drinking water. While most of the 1,172-mile (1,885-km) pipeline is complete, Energy Transfer Partners, the line's owner, needed an easement from the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) to drill under Lake Oahe.



Army denies Dakota pipeline permit, in victory for Native tribes

Activist Hugh Ahnatock of the Inupiaq tribe pauses after singing while the sun rises inside of the Oceti Sakowin camp as demonstrations continue against plans to pass the Dakota Access pipelineBy Ernest Scheyder and Valerie Volcovici CANNON BALL, N.D./WASHINGTON (Reuters) - The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers said on Sunday it turned down a permit for a controversial pipeline project running through North Dakota, in a victory for Native Americans and climate activists who have protested against the project for months. A celebration erupted at the main protest camp in Cannon Ball, North Dakota, where the Standing Rock Sioux tribe and others have been protesting against the 1,172-mile (1,885-km) Dakota Access Pipeline. It may prove to be a short-lived victory, however, because Republican President-elect Donald Trump has said he supports the project.



Italy firms as investors bet against immediate snap election

Employee of a foreign exchange trading company works near monitors showing Italian Prime Minister Matteo Renzi on TV news, and the Japanese yen's exchange rate against the euro in TokyoLONDON (Reuters) - Italian shares rose on Monday as investors bet against an immediate snap election in Italy following Prime Minister Matteo Renzi's resignation after defeat in a constitutional reform referendum.





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