Nuns who help homeless face eviction in costly San Francisco

Sister Mary Benedicte, left, serves food at the Fraternite Notre Dame Mary of Nazareth Soup Kitchen in San Francisco, Tuesday, Feb. 9, 2016. San Francisco nuns who serve the homeless are in danger of getting kicked out of their home after a rent hike of more than 50 percent. (AP Photo/Jeff Chiu)SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — San Francisco nuns who serve the homeless are in danger of getting kicked out of their home after a rent hike of more than 50 percent, another example of the struggle to balance soaring living costs in a booming economy.



Obama seeks cybersecurity boost to replace 'ancient' tech

Obama seeks cybersecurity boost to replace 'ancient' techWASHINGTON (AP) — President Barack Obama said Tuesday he is asking Congress for $3.1 billion to update the government's archaic computers systems to protect them from cyberattacks as part of a new, centralized effort to boost cybersecurity.



Judge's error could set man free without trial for murder

ATLANTA (AP) — A mistake by a superior court judge may set a Georgia man free without him ever having to stand trial.
New Hampshire votes in high-profile US primary

An election worker hands out stickers to voters after casting their ballots at Belmont High School on February 9, 2016 in Belmont, New HampshireAfter months of studying and meeting candidates, New Hampshire residents trooped to polls Tuesday in the second key test of the White House race, with Donald Trump chasing victory and Hillary Clinton looking to reel in local hero Bernie Sanders. Once every four years, the nation's eyes focus like laser beams on little, largely rural New Hampshire, which holds the first state primaries after the Iowa caucuses kick off the US presidential nomination process. The proud northeastern state, home to just 1.3 million people, sets the tone for the primaries -- and could whittle down a crowded Republican field as the arch-conservative Senator Ted Cruz and more mainstream candidates led by Senator Marco Rubio battle for second place behind frontrunner Trump.



FBI director says investigators unable to unlock San Bernardino shooter's phone content

FBI Director Comey speaks about terrorism at the NYPD Shield Conference in the Manhattan borough of New YorkBy Dustin Volz and Mark Hosenball WASHINGTON (Reuters) - FBI Director James Comey said on Tuesday that federal investigators have still been unable to access the contents of a cellphone belonging to one of the killers in the Dec. 2 shootings in San Bernardino, California, due to encryption technology. Comey told the Senate Intelligence Committee that the phenomenon of communications "going dark" due to more sophisticated technology and wider use of encryption is "overwhelmingly affecting" law enforcement operations, including investigations into murder, car accidents, drug trafficking and the proliferation of child pornography. "We still have one of those killer's phones that we have not been able to open," Comey said in reference to the San Bernardino attack.





Close Window